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Glossary

 



Glossary Index

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U
UCC

Uniform Commercial Code

The Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) is a comprehensive set of laws governing commercial transactions between U.S. states and territories. These transactions include borrowing money, leases, contracts, and the sale of goods. UCC is not a federal law, but a product of the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws and the American Law Institute. Both of these organizations are private entities that recommend the adopting of UCC by state governments. State legislatures may either adopt UCC verbatim or may modify it to meet the state's needs. Once a state's legislature adopts and enacts UCC, it becomes a state law and is codified in the state's statutes. All 50 states and territories have enacted some version of UCC.
Source: U.S. Small Business Administration website.
UK Electronic Alliance

UKEA

The UK Electronic Alliance (UKEA) was formed in response to the Electronics Innovation and Growth Team (EIGT) Report, which was published by the DTI in 2005. The EIGT Report stated ‘that the fragmented, diverse nature of the (electronics) industry, and its difficulty representing itself to Government and vice versa, led to delays in addressing some of the key issues which impact on its performance’. The UKEA pulls together the diverse group of trade associations within the electronics sector, presenting a unique opportunity for the electronics sector to speak with a co–ordinated voice. It provides a resource for government departments and agencies to enable them to have greater confidence when forming policy and support programmes for the sector. These activities require focused co-ordination, and typically would not be delivered through a “piecemeal” approach with each association “sharing” tasks or activities.
Source: UKEA website
UKEA

UK Electronic Alliance

The UK Electronic Alliance (UKEA) was formed in response to the Electronics Innovation and Growth Team (EIGT) Report, which was published by the DTI in 2005. The EIGT Report stated ‘that the fragmented, diverse nature of the (electronics) industry, and its difficulty representing itself to Government and vice versa, led to delays in addressing some of the key issues which impact on its performance’. The UKEA pulls together the diverse group of trade associations within the electronics sector, presenting a unique opportunity for the electronics sector to speak with a co–ordinated voice. It provides a resource for government departments and agencies to enable them to have greater confidence when forming policy and support programmes for the sector. These activities require focused co-ordination, and typically would not be delivered through a “piecemeal” approach with each association “sharing” tasks or activities.
Source: UKEA website
Unauthorized Distributor

Unauthorized Supplier

Slang term used to describe an Independent Distributor. See Independent Distributor.
Unauthorized Supplier

Unauthorized Distributor

Slang term used to describe an Independent Distributor. See Independent Distributor.
Uniform Commercial Code

UCC

The Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) is a comprehensive set of laws governing commercial transactions between U.S. states and territories. These transactions include borrowing money, leases, contracts, and the sale of goods. UCC is not a federal law, but a product of the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws and the American Law Institute. Both of these organizations are private entities that recommend the adopting of UCC by state governments. State legislatures may either adopt UCC verbatim or may modify it to meet the state's needs. Once a state's legislature adopts and enacts UCC, it becomes a state law and is codified in the state's statutes. All 50 states and territories have enacted some version of UCC.
Source: U.S. Small Business Administration website.
Uprated


Assessment that results in the extension of a part’s ratings to meet the performance requirements of an application in which the part is used outside the manufacturer’s specification range.
Source: SAE Aerospace Standard AS6081 Fraudulent/Counterfeit Electronic Parts: Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition – Distributors
Upscreened


Additional part testing performed to produce parts verified to specifications beyond the part manufacturer’s operating parameters. Examples are Particle Impact Noise Testing (PIND), temperature screening, Radiation Hardness Assurance testing, etc.
Source: SAE Aerospace Standard AS6081 Fraudulent/Counterfeit Electronic Parts: Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition – Distributors
Used


Product that has been electrically charged and subsequently pulled or removed from a socket or other electronic application, excluding electrical testing for acceptance. Used product may be received in non-standard packaging (i.e., bulk), and may contain mixed lots, date codes, be from different facilities, etc. Parts may have physical defects such as scratches, slightly bent leads, test dots, faded markings, chemical residue or other signs of use, but the leads should be intact. Used product may be sold with a limited warranty, and programmable parts may still contain partial or complete programming which could impact the part’s functionality. Used parts marketed as refurbished shall be declared as such.
Source: SAE Aerospace Standard AS6081 Fraudulent/Counterfeit Electronic Parts: Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition – Distributors