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Glossary Index

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D
Decap


The act of removing the top surface of a part in order to expose the die. Decapsulation can be chemical, mechanical, laser, or by heat and is destructive.
Source: IDEA Standard IDEA-STD-1010-B Acceptability of Electronic Components Distributed in the Open Market, Rev. B.
DEF STAN 05-135

Defense Standard 05-135

This Defence Standard defines the arrangements that a supplier is required to establish to demonstrate that they are actively planning and managing the risk of counterfeit materiel in their supply chain to prevent delivery of such materiel to the MOD.
Date Published: 2014-07-10
Source: UK Ministry of Defence website
Defective Part


(1) A counterfeit part type. (2.) A part not manufactured in accordance with the Intellectual Property Rights Holder’s specifications that is rejected during final manufacturing testing and that is subsequently identified as defective and marked for destruction but that is sold and/or distributed without the IP holders knowledge or consent. See: Recycled Part, Remarked Part, Overproduced Part, Cloned Part, Tampered Part Note: “The other variation of an untrusted foundry/assembly sourcing counterfeit components is out of specification or rejected components. They may either knowingly sell these components, or the components may be stolen and sold on open markets. During manufacturing tests, a component is considered defective if it produces an incorrect response to even one test vector. Sometimes, the probability of activating a component’s defective node is extremely small. If these components make their way into the supply chain, detection will be extremely difficult as they produce correct responses in most of the test cases. These components can pose a serious threat to the quality and reliability of a system.”"
Source: “Counterfeit Integrated Circuits: Detection, Avoidance, and the Challenges Ahead” by Ujjwal Guin, Daniel DiMase and Mohammad Tehranipoor
Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement

DFARS

A supplement to the FAR that provides DoD-specific acquisition regulations that DoD government acquisition officials – and those contractors doing business with DoD – must follow in the procurement process for goods and services.
Source: Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) website
Defense Standard 05-135

DEF STAN 05-135

This Defence Standard defines the arrangements that a supplier is required to establish to demonstrate that they are actively planning and managing the risk of counterfeit materiel in their supply chain to prevent delivery of such materiel to the MOD.
Date Published: 2014-07-10
Source: UK Ministry of Defence website
Delamination


A failure found during tensile pull of flip chip solder joints, where the solder bump interconnection metallization is at least partially removed from either the substrate or the die, with the solder bump remaining continuous.
Source: JEDEC website referencing JESD22-B109, 6/02
Delayering


Delayering is a process that involves removing various layers from an integrated circuit.
Source: Nisene Technology Group website
Desiccant


An absorbent material used to maintain a low relative humidity.
Source: JEDEC website referencing J-STD-033B, 10/05
Destructive Physical Analysis


A systematic, logical, detailed examination of parts during various stages of physical disassembly, conducted on a sample of completed parts from a given lot, wherein parts are examined for a wide variety of design, workmanship, and/or processing problems. Information derived from DPA may be used to:
  • Preclude installation of inauthentic parts or parts having patent or latent defects
  • Aid indisposition of parts that exhibit anomalies
  • Aid in defining improvements or changes in design, materials, or processes
  • Evaluate Supplier production trends
Source: SAE Aerospace Standard AS6081 Fraudulent/Counterfeit Electronic Parts: Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition – Distributors
Device Marking Test (formerly Solvent A Test)


A chemical wipe test consisting of three (3) parts mineral spirits and one (1) part isopropyl alcohol (IPA) solution to check for ink marking permanency. See also Marking Permanency Testing.
Source: IDEA Standard IDEA-STD-1010-B Acceptability of Electronic Components Distributed in the Open Market, Rev. B.
Device Surface Test (formerly Solvent B Test)


A chemical wipe test using acetone to check for blacktopping of parts.
Source: IDEA Standard IDEA-STD-1010-B Acceptability of Electronic Components Distributed in the Open Market, Rev. B.
DFARS

Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement

A supplement to the FAR that provides DoD-specific acquisition regulations that DoD government acquisition officials – and those contractors doing business with DoD – must follow in the procurement process for goods and services.
Source: Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) website
Die


A small, square or rectangle piece of semiconductor material usually silicon, onto which a complete integrated circuit is etched. The die is internal and encapsulated in the package.
Source: IDEA Standard IDEA-STD-1010-B Acceptability of Electronic Components Distributed in the Open Market, Rev. B.
Die Attach

Die Bond

The process or method of physically mounting a chip on a surface, substrate, header, etc.; also known as "die attach(ment)" or "chip attach(ment)".
Source: JEDEC website referencing JESD51-1, 12/95
Die Bond

Die Attach

The process or method of physically mounting a chip on a surface, substrate, header, etc.; also known as "die attach(ment)" or "chip attach(ment)".
Source: JEDEC website referencing JESD51-1, 12/95
Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages

DMSMS

DMSMS is defined by the Department of Defense (DoD) as the "...loss or impending loss of the last known manufacturer or supplier of raw material, production parts, or repair parts," and by industry as the "...loss or impending loss of the original manufacturer or supplier of raw material, production parts or repair parts." An obsolete device is part of a larger system that is no longer manufactured by the original manufacturer. DMSMS management is a multidisciplinary process to identify issues resulting from obsolescence, loss of manufacturing sources, or material shortages; to access the potential for a negative impacts to readiness; to analyze potential mitigation strategies; and then to implement the most cost-effective strategy.
Department of Defense - http://www.dsp.dla.mil/APP_UIL/displayPage.aspx?action=content&accounttype=displayHTML&contentid=56
Discrete Components

Active Discrete Components
Passive Discrete Components

Discrete components are simply defined as single element (circuit) electronic devices. Discrete devices are subgrouped by passive (primarily to regulate voltage and current flows, although they cannot achieve power gain) and active (switching devices, with the exception of LED). Most commonly and for relevance in inspection methodologies, passive discrete components do not contain a silicon wafer while active components do. Active Discrete components increase the power of a signal and must be supplied with the signal and a source of power. The signal is fed into one connection of the active device and the amplified version taken from another connection. In a transistor, the signal can be applied to the base connection and the amplified version taken from the collector. The source of power is usually a direct current voltage from a battery or power supply. Examples are bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, light emitting diodes (LED), metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFED), etc. Passive Discrete components do not increase the power of a signal. They often cause power to be lost. Some can increase the voltage at the expense of current, so overall there is a loss of power. Examples are resistors, capacitors, inductors and diodes (the latter is a special case).
Sources: IDEA Standard IDEA-STD-1010-B Acceptability of Electronic Components Distributed in the Open Market, Rev. B and White Horse Laboratories, Ltd
Disposition


Decisions made by authorized representatives within an Organization concerning future treatment of nonconforming material. Examples of dispositions are to scrap, use-as-is (normally accompanied by an approved variance/waiver), retest, rework, repair, or return-to-supplier.
Source: SAE Aerospace Standard AS5553Rev. B Counterfeit Electrical, Electronic, and Electromechanical (EEE) Parts; Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition
Distribution Agreement


A specific, written contract between the manufacturing organization and the authorized distributor that authorizes the distributor to resell the manufacturing organizations parts. NOTE 1 Contractual terms include, but are not limited to, distribution region, distribution products or lines, and warranty flow down from the manufacturer. NOTE 2 These agreements often include failure analysis support, return privileges, and product change notifications as well.
Source: JEDEC Standard No. 243, Counterfeit Electronic Parts: Non-Proliferation for Manufacturers
DMSMS

Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages

DMSMS is defined by the Department of Defense (DoD) as the "...loss or impending loss of the last known manufacturer or supplier of raw material, production parts, or repair parts," and by industry as the "...loss or impending loss of the original manufacturer or supplier of raw material, production parts or repair parts." An obsolete device is part of a larger system that is no longer manufactured by the original manufacturer. DMSMS management is a multidisciplinary process to identify issues resulting from obsolescence, loss of manufacturing sources, or material shortages; to access the potential for a negative impacts to readiness; to analyze potential mitigation strategies; and then to implement the most cost-effective strategy.
Department of Defense - http://www.dsp.dla.mil/APP_UIL/displayPage.aspx?action=content&accounttype=displayHTML&contentid=56
DNA Marking


In the electronics industry, the use of DNA applied to a microcircuit or device to enable supply chain traceability. If applied by a manufacturer, DNA marking can be used to verify authenticity.
DNA Taggant


DNA contained in a material (e.g. paint, ink, textile, etc.) applied to a microcircuit or device.
DOD Counterfeit Prevention Policy

DOD Instruction (DODI) No. 4140.67

On April 26, 2013 — ten months after the date required by Section 818 — the Pentagon released DOD Instruction (DODI) No. 4140.67, the ‘‘DOD Counterfeit Prevention Policy,’’ which responds to the law’s direction. DODI 4140.67 establishes DOD’s policy and assigns responsibilities necessary to prevent the introduction of ‘‘counterfeit material’’ at ‘‘any level’’ of the DOD supply chain. The DODI extends beyond electronic parts (the focus of Section 818) to all ‘‘materiel,’’ which is defined very broadly, applying to system components and subcomponents as well as to software and information and communications technology (ICT). The new DODI addresses anticounterfeit measures for weapon systems as well as information systems. That counterfeit materiel avoidance policy now extends outside electronic parts and specifically to both software and ICT is a further indication of DOD’s emphasis on areas where cyber security and information assurance concerns interact with counterfeit parts prevention. Going beyond Section 818, which applied to electronic parts and large government contractors, the new DODI applies to any form of at-risk materiel and ‘‘at any level of the DOD supply chain.’’
Source: Robert S. Metzger, Rogers Joseph O’Donnell, P.C.
DOD Instruction (DODI) No. 4140.67

DOD Counterfeit Prevention Policy

On April 26, 2013 — ten months after the date required by Section 818 — the Pentagon released DOD Instruction (DODI) No. 4140.67, the ‘‘DOD Counterfeit Prevention Policy,’’ which responds to the law’s direction. DODI 4140.67 establishes DOD’s policy and assigns responsibilities necessary to prevent the introduction of ‘‘counterfeit material’’ at ‘‘any level’’ of the DOD supply chain. The DODI extends beyond electronic parts (the focus of Section 818) to all ‘‘materiel,’’ which is defined very broadly, applying to system components and subcomponents as well as to software and information and communications technology (ICT). The new DODI addresses anticounterfeit measures for weapon systems as well as information systems. That counterfeit materiel avoidance policy now extends outside electronic parts and specifically to both software and ICT is a further indication of DOD’s emphasis on areas where cyber security and information assurance concerns interact with counterfeit parts prevention. Going beyond Section 818, which applied to electronic parts and large government contractors, the new DODI applies to any form of at-risk materiel and ‘‘at any level of the DOD supply chain.’’
Source: Robert S. Metzger, Rogers Joseph O’Donnell, P.C.
DOD Section 818

NDAA 2012 Section 818
Section 818

(1.) Directs the Secretary to assess DOD acquisition policies and systems for the detection and avoidance of counterfeit electronic parts. (2.) Outlines specific actions to be taken by the Secretary following such assessment, including revising the DOD Supplement to FAR to address such detection and avoidance. (3.) Provides contractor responsibilities relating to such detection and avoidance. (4.) Requires DOD contractors and subcontractors at all tiers, whenever possible, to obtain electronic parts from trusted suppliers (as compiled by DOD). (5.) Requires any DOD contractor or subcontractor who becomes aware of or has reason to suspect that any end item, component, part, or material contained in supplies purchased by DOD is counterfeit to report such fact to appropriate government authorities and the Government-Industry Data Exchange Program. (6.) Directs the Secretary of Homeland Security to establish a methodology for the targeting of imported electronic parts as counterfeit sources. (7.) Requires the DOD Secretary to implement a program to enhance contractor detection and avoidance of counterfeit electronic parts. (8.) Amends the federal criminal code to provide criminal penalties for the intentional trafficking in counterfeit military goods or services. (9.) Requires the Attorney General to include in an annual report to Congress on Department of Justice (DOJ) business all DOJ actions taken with respect to such trafficking.
Source: GovTrack Website.
Dry pack


Dry pack consists of desiccant material and a Humidity Indicator Card (HIC) sealed with the Surface Mount Device (SMD) packages inside a moisture barrier bag (MBB).
Source: IDEA Standard IDEA-STD-1010-B Acceptability of Electronic Components Distributed in the Open Market, Rev. B and IPC/JEDEC, J-STD-033B.1: Handling, Packing, Shipping and Use of Moisture/Reflow Sensitive Surface Mount Devices
Dynasolve


A Dynaloy custom-manufactured conformal coating remover product designed to strip specific polymer materials from all types of electronic components.
Source: Dynaloy website.