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T
Tampered Part


(1) A counterfeit part type. See: Recycled Part, Remarked Part, Overproduced Part, Out-of-spec Part, Cloned Part Note: “Tampering can be done during any phase of the life cycle of a component. It can either be on the die level (“hardware Trojan”) or package level. Such components can either act as a silicon time bomb where the device can behave differently under certain conditions or act as a backdoor where secret information from the chip can be sent out to an adversary. In both cases, the chip behaves outside of its specification, and thus we have included such ICs as counterfeit parts. A detailed taxonomy for tampering a device by hardware Trojans can be found in.” Additional reading: Tehranipoor M, Koushanfar F (2010) A survey of hardware Trojan taxonomy and detection. IEEE Des Test Comput 27(1):10–25"
Source: “Counterfeit Integrated Circuits: Detection, Avoidance, and the Challenges Ahead” by Ujjwal Guin, Daniel DiMase and Mohammad Tehranipoor
Temperature Cycling

Thermal Cycle Testing

This test is conducted to determine the ability of components and solder interconnects to withstand mechanical stresses induced by alternating high- and low-temperature extremes. Permanent changes in electrical and/or physical characteristics can result from these mechanical stresses.
Source: JEDEC Standard, JESD22-A104D: Temperature Cycling.
Thermal Cycle Testing

Temperature Cycling

This test is conducted to determine the ability of components and solder interconnects to withstand mechanical stresses induced by alternating high- and low-temperature extremes. Permanent changes in electrical and/or physical characteristics can result from these mechanical stresses.
Source: JEDEC Standard, JESD22-A104D: Temperature Cycling.
Tin Whiskers


“Whiskers”, first identified in electroplated cadmium components during the late 1940’s, appear to essentially be an extrusion, or hairlike growth emanating from the surface of the tin plate. They can sometimes grow long enough to cause a short circuit between leads, or may break off and cause damage elsewhere in the device. It is generally agreed that pure tin finishes (and other high-tin content lead-free alloy finishes) present a risk of tin-whisker failures in electronics, particularly those demanding high reliability.
Source: Silicon Cert Laboratories website.
Trailer

Leader

The blank pockets at the beginning and ending of component carrier tape.
Source: IDEA Standard IDEA-STD-1010-B Acceptability of Electronic Components Distributed in the Open Market, Rev. B