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ERAI Blog

Use Caution to Avoid Counterfeit Nichia Laser Diode Products

Kristal Snider
02/14/2018

Nichia Corporation published a press release alerting customers a “large number” of counterfeit Nichia laser diode products have entered the supply chain.

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Do Cloned Parts Exist in the Market?

Mark Snider & Anne-Liese Heinichen
02/09/2018

Let’s start with the definition of a cloned part. SAE Aerospace Standard AS6171 Test Methods Standard; General Requirements, Suspect/Counterfeit, Electrical, Electronic, and Electromechanical Parts defines cloned parts as one of seven counterfeit part types:

A reproduction of a part produced by an unauthorized manufacturer without approval or design authority that replicates the authorized manufacturer’s part. NOTE: Cloning eliminates the large development cost of a part. Cloning can be done in two ways: by reverse engineering or by obtaining design information and/or technical data inappropriately (such as by unauthorized knowledge transfer from a person with access to the part design).

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How To Spot A Counterfeit Part- The Counterfeit Determination Dilemma

Anne-Liese Heinichen
10/18/2017

While most government and private organizations can agree upon the definition of a counterfeit part, how, who and when to label a part as counterfeit remains a debatable issue.

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SAE AS6171 Improves Identification of Suspect Counterfeit EEE Parts

Kristal Snider
08/03/2017

Earlier this month, Advanced Component Testing, an independent electronic component test lab, performed a gap analysis between AS6171 and AS6081 to demonstrate the heightened stringency required by the newer AS6171 standard. The results of the comparison were captured in the enclosed paper.

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SAE AS6171 (Test Methods Standard; General Requirements, Suspect/Counterfeit, Electrical, Electronic, and Electromechanical Parts) PUBLISHED!

Anne-Liese Heinichen
11/01/2016

SAE International has just published AS6171 – Test Methods Standard; General Requirements, Suspect/Counterfeit, Electrical, Electronic and Electromechanical Parts. According to SAE, the standard was developed to, “provide uniform requirements, practices and methods for testing EEE parts to mitigate the risks of receiving or using SC [suspect/counterfeit] EEE parts.”

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Counterfeits and E-Waste – Your Voice Matters – Sign this Petition to Support SEERA!

Kristal Snider
07/26/2016

The federal government and the defense industry are enacting new policies and practices to prevent the introduction of counterfeit components into supply chains along with methods to detect them should they slip through yet, despite several attempts, no federal e-waste recycling mandate currently exists.

Two previous bipartisan bills were introduced which would forbid U.S. companies from exporting e-waste:  H.R.2284 - Responsible Electronics Recycling Act (introduced June 22, 2011) and H.R.2791 - Responsible Electronics Recycling Act (introduced July 23, 2013). Both versions of the bill died.

On June 24, 2016 Rep. Gene Green (D-TX) along with Rep. Paul Cook (R-CA) launched a third attempt to stop the flow of electronic waste to China and other countries known for producing counterfeit electronic parts by introducing H.R. 5579, the Secure E-waste Export and Recycling Act (SEERA).

We need broad industry support in order to pass this legislation.


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US Senate designates July as anti-counterfeiting awareness month

Kristal Snider
07/22/2016

The US Senate has passed a resolution designating July as an anti-counterfeiting consumer awareness month.

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Unregulated E-Waste Keeps the Counterfeiters’ Funnel Full

Kristal Snider
07/18/2016

It is 2016: fifteen years since China was admitted to the WTO and the first counterfeit part was reported to ERAI; a decade since ERAI’s President made a second trip to China to see firsthand how e-waste was being used to fuel what has been referred to as a counterfeit epidemic; and nine years since I wrote ...

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Authentic Parts Classified as Counterfeit and Seized by CBP Highlight Financial Risks for Importers and Exporters

Kristal Snider
07/11/2016

For more than a year, beginning in January 2014, a distributor in the U.S. placed eleven (11) orders for more than 16,000 pieces of Texas Instruments part number TMS320VC5416ZGU160 from an Israeli distributor and subcontractor servicing the defense, medical and communications industries in Israel. No nonconformities were ever detected during the inspection of these shipments. No complaints or concerns were raised by the U.S. distributor’s end user and sole recipient of all prior shipments. For all intents and purposes, the Israeli and American companies enjoyed a mutually beneficial relationship and no one, including the end user, had reason to suspect the goods in question were anything other than genuine Texas Instruments parts. That is, until May 4, 2015, when one of the final three scheduled deliveries containing 4,000 pieces of the aforementioned part worth $46,435.00 was detained and subsequently seized by CBP under Title 19, United States Code, Section (USC) 1595a(C) for bearing a counterfeit trademark. The initial detention notice triggered a flurry of activity that would slow to a crawl, then drag on for ten costly, labor-intensive months and ultimately conclude with the release of the goods. This distributor’s experience captures the significance of goods being correctly classified as authentic or counterfeit, highlights the importance of an open line of communication between CBP and industry, and personifies the struggles business owners are facing that could result in substantial financial loss. 

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The Standards Development Process

Anne-Liese Heinichen
03/11/2016

As many of you know, ERAI staff is involved in the industry standards development process, specifically through SAE International. As a whole, SAE standards are developed to “ensure the safety, quality, and effectiveness of products and services”. While many of these standards tend to focus on aerospace, automotive, defense and other critical sectors, most are drafted to encompass general processes throughout multiple industries on an international level. Many are designed with a specific focus on an activity (e.g. distribution, manufacturing, integration) and material (e.g. EEE parts, counterfeit part mitigation).

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